Scotland's Coastal Heritage at Risk

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North Uist, Loch Paible, Dun Steingarry; Cuithe Steilligarry (9416)

Current Priority
2
East
71980
North
868380
Site Type
Dun (Possible)
Period
Unknown

Dun Steingarry (also known as Cuithe Steilligarry stood at the SW corner of Loch Paible, its site being traceable as a symmetrical flat knoll with practically no remains of walls. It evidently occupied an islet in shallow water before the loch was drained, before 1793. 1911.
There is no trace of antiquity on the knoll at NF 7198 6838, the only knoll in the area. Although the name 'Steingarry' is known locally it is applied loosely to the rocks around Hanglam (NF 762 681). 1965. No trace of a dun could be found at this location though there were a number of larger boulders on the beach. It is possible that there could be remains beneath the surface.

ShoreUPDATE May 2016 Although there is little surface expression on surface of the knoll behind the coast edge, a long curvilinear stone wall on the shore encloses the peninsula. This wall is spread to a width of over c.1m and is constructed of large boulders up to 1m in size, incorporating bedrock outcrops along part of its length. Further stonework is visible in stretches of the coast edge forming a wall of 2-3 courses, up to 1m high and incorporating massive boulders. The coast edge is intermittently vegetated but no cultural material or midden was noted in the exposed parts of the section. It's likely that there is a large structure buried in the headland.

There are extensive areas of peat shelf exposed on the beach here, which in places is eroding rapidly. This has been noted for its palaeoenvironmental potential and levels of organic preservation; wooden, bone and antler artefacts have been recovered here during previous investigation of the site and by walkers while excavation identified a number of features and anthropogenic deposits.

The dun probably formed the focal point of activity in this area. Other sites in this vicinity (9406, 9410, 9411, 9413, 9414, 9415) are related to this master record for the area. This site record reflects the overall archaeological importance, potential and vulnerability to coastal processes of this area of Loch Paible.

Condition and current recommendations:

Condition
Eroding
Action
None

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Record 444 on map 9 in CZAS, North Uist (west), 2005

Other records:

NMRS
9989
SMR
Unknown

ShoreUpdates

1 ShoreUpdate accepted and 0 pending.

Click on an update to expand it.

8th May, 2016 by EllieSCHARP
Survey Information
User:
EllieSCHARP
Date:
May 8, 2016
Tidal state:
low
Site located?:
Yes
Condition Information
Proximity to coast edge:
intertidal
Coastally eroding?:
active sea erosion; has eroded in the past
Is there a coastal defence?:
no
Description:

Dun Steingarry (also known as Cuithe Steilligarry stood at the SW corner of Loch Paible, its site being traceable as a symmetrical flat knoll with practically no remains of walls. It evidently occupied an islet in shallow water before the loch was drained, before 1793. 1911.
There is no trace of antiquity on the knoll at NF 7198 6838, the only knoll in the area. Although the name 'Steingarry' is known locally it is applied loosely to the rocks around Hanglam (NF 762 681). 1965. No trace of a dun could be found at this location though there were a number of larger boulders on the beach. It is possible that there could be remains beneath the surface.

ShoreUPDATE May 2016 Although there is little surface expression on surface of the knoll behind the coast edge, a long curvilinear stone wall on the shore encloses the peninsula. This wall is spread to a width of over c.1m and is constructed of large boulders up to 1m in size, incorporating bedrock outcrops along part of its length. Further stonework is visible in stretches of the coast edge forming a wall of 2-3 courses, up to 1m high and incorporating massive boulders. The coast edge is intermittently vegetated but no cultural material or midden was noted in the exposed parts of the section. It's likely that there is a large structure buried in the headland.

There are extensive areas of peat shelf exposed on the beach here, which in places is eroding rapidly. This has been noted for its palaeoenvironmental potential and levels of organic preservation; wooden, bone and antler artefacts have been recovered here during previous investigation of the site and by walkers while excavation identified a number of features and anthropogenic deposits.

The dun probably formed the focal point of activity in this area. Other sites in this vicinity (9406, 9410, 9411, 9413, 9414, 9415) are related to this master record for the area. This site record reflects the overall archaeological importance, potential and vulnerability to coastal processes of this area of Loch Paible.

Management Information
How visible are the remains? (above ground):
highly visible (substantial remains)
How visible are the remains? (in section):
clearly visible in section
Comments and recommendations
Recommendations:

Assign priority 2 to reflect the archaeological importance of the dun site and wider area, which incorporates a number of other sites and peat deposits with high archaeological and palaeoenvironmental potential; and their vulnerability to coastal processes.