Scotland's Coastal Heritage at Risk

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Dumbuck (8186)

Current Priority
2
East
241570
North
673920
Site Type
Crannog
Period
4th Mill-BC-1st Cen

The Dumbuck crannog was discovered within the tidal water of the River Clyde, and excavated in 1898. Substantial structural remains found in the 19th century were resurveyed at low tide periods during the summer of 1997. The survey revealed a circular wooden platform surrounded by 22 piles. The internal platform consists of surface horizontal timbers aligned both radically and circumferentially. Around the platform is a circular stone 'breakwater'. Other features include the remains of a central circular feature, referred to in 1900 as a ?stone-walled cavity ... with wattle or basket-work'. Previous investigations referred to a dock structure to the E of the site, but this could not be found. The 19th-century spoil heap and fence post, which held a sign during excavation open days, were found. The site is approximately 50m from the present HWM and becomes completely covered by high tide. It appears to be under threat from marine erosion which has badly damaged the surface piles and horizontal timbers. A G C Hale 1997. Inaccessible at time of visit.

ShoreUPDATE December 2015

There appears to be more exposure of timbers since personal last visit in 1997, especially in northern section of the site (see sketch plan with exposed timbers marked in red imposed on Alex Hale's plan - and attached slides.

The site of the 'port' on its east side is now not visible other than a very shallow gully

Condition and current recommendations:

Condition
Poor
Action
Monitor site to report erosion

Over to you...

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Record 86 on map C3 in Coastal Zone Assessment Survey, Firth of Clyde and Isle of Bute, 2004

Other records:

NMRS
43402
SMR
7952

ShoreUpdates

1 ShoreUpdate accepted and 0 pending.

Click on an update to expand it.

26th November, 2015 by ianm
Survey Information
User:
ianm
Date:
Nov. 26, 2015
Tidal state:
low
Site located?:
Yes
Condition Information
Proximity to coast edge:
intertidal
Coastally eroding?:
active sea erosion; has eroded in the past
Is there a coastal defence?:
no
Other threats?:
water erosion (e.g. stream, etc)
Description:

The Dumbuck crannog was discovered within the tidal water of the River Clyde, and excavated in 1898. Substantial structural remains found in the 19th century were resurveyed at low tide periods during the summer of 1997. The survey revealed a circular wooden platform surrounded by 22 piles. The internal platform consists of surface horizontal timbers aligned both radically and circumferentially. Around the platform is a circular stone 'breakwater'. Other features include the remains of a central circular feature, referred to in 1900 as a ?stone-walled cavity ... with wattle or basket-work'. Previous investigations referred to a dock structure to the E of the site, but this could not be found. The 19th-century spoil heap and fence post, which held a sign during excavation open days, were found. The site is approximately 50m from the present HWM and becomes completely covered by high tide. It appears to be under threat from marine erosion which has badly damaged the surface piles and horizontal timbers. A G C Hale 1997. Inaccessible at time of visit.

ShoreUPDATE November 2015

There appears to be more exposure of timbers since personal last visit in 1997, especially in northern section of the site (see sketch plan with exposed timbers marked in red imposed on Alex Hale's plan - and attached slides.

The site of the 'port' on its east side is now not visible other than a very shallow gully

Management Information
How visible are the remains? (above ground):
highly visible (substantial remains)
How visible are the remains? (in section):
not visible
How accessibile is the site?:
easily accessible- no restrictions; accessible on foot (no footpath)
The site is:
is well known; has local associations/history
Comments and recommendations
Comments:

There appears to be more exposure of timbers since personal last visit in 1997, especially in northern section of the site (see sketch plan with exposed timbers marked in red imposed on Alex Hale's plan - and attached slides.

The site of the 'port' on its east side is now not visible other than a very shallow gully.

Recommendations:

Annual inspection visits with sketch plans and measurements of visible timbers.