Scotland's Coastal Heritage at Risk

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Runna Clett (6802)

Current Priority
1
East
366591
North
1045421
Site Type
Mound & Coastal Exposure
Period
Unknown: ?prehistoric

A slight rise is located on the coast edge. It measures 30m in diameter and is up to 1.5m high. Sea erosion in front of the mound has exposed archaeological deposits in a 25m long section. To the west side, these include a band of highly organic soil, covering shell midden, which is predominantly cockle. To the east side, occasional large stones and a block of coursed masonry protrude from the section. The block of masonry is faced on one side, extends for 1m and stands to 0.5m or 6 courses in height. The stones lie over a very distinctive, highly organic silty soil layer which is up to 0.35m deep. The site was previously recorded as a broch, on the tenuous evidence that it had been included as such on Petrie's list. Cartloads of stone are said to have been removed from the site, but there is no record of what, if anything, was uncovered during these investigations. Ref.: Orkney Name Book, 2, #24; Petrie, G (1873), 'Notice of the brochs or large round towers of Orkney', Arch Scotica, 5 (1874-1890), 71-94; Hamilton, JRC (1968) 'Excavations at Clickhimin, Shetland', 174; RCAHMS (1946), #182; RCAHMS (1980), #151.

ShoreUPDATE may 2013 CP- as described above.

ShoreUPDATE March 2016:

As described. There are two very distinct layers. The lower is a compacted and mid orangey brown, with dry stone-built structures. Struck flint, including a scraper and animal bone are visible in this deposit. The upper layer is looser and very dark brown containing frequent animal and fish bone.

ShoreUPDATE August 2018:

As described. The stone structures could be the remains of a single drystone building. There are two areas of coursed stonework with a large orthostat between them. Several pieces of struck flint [at least 2 snapped blades] were recovered from the eroding lower compact orangey brown deposit. No animal bone or pottery visible despite careful scrutiny.

Condition and current recommendations:

Condition
Fair/poor
Action
Visit - check condition; characterise site and obtain dating evidence ;
Survey site - using several techniques to characterise site

Over to you...

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Record SY155 on map Sanday: Map 11 in Orkney Coastal Survey: Sanday & North Ronaldsay, 1999

Other records:

NMRS
3490
SMR
SMR142

ShoreUpdates

2 ShoreUpdates accepted and 0 pending.

Click on an update to expand it.

26th May, 2013 by cparker
Survey Information
User:
cparker
Date:
May 26, 2013
Tidal state:
low
Site located?:
Yes
Condition Information
Proximity to coast edge:
coast edge
Coastally eroding?:
active sea erosion
Is there a coastal defence?:
no
Other threats?:
none
Description:

A slight rise is located on the coast edge. It measures 30m in diameter and is up to 1.5m high. Sea erosion in front of the mound has exposed archaeological deposits in a 25m long section. To the west side, these include a band of highly organic soil, covering shell midden, which is predominantly cockle. To the east side, occasional large stones and a block of coursed masonry protrude from the section. The block of masonry is faced on one side, extends for 1m and stands to 0.5m or 6 courses in height. The stones lie over a very distinctive, highly organic silty soil layer which is up to 0.35m deep. The site was previously recorded as a broch, on the tenuous evidence that it had been included as such on Petrie's list. Cartloads of stone are said to have been removed from the site, but there is no record of what, if anything, was uncovered during these investigations. Ref.: Orkney Name Book, 2, #24; Petrie, G (1873), 'Notice of the brochs or large round towers of Orkney', Arch Scotica, 5 (1874-1890), 71-94; Hamilton, JRC (1968) 'Excavations at Clickhimin, Shetland', 174; RCAHMS (1946), #182; RCAHMS (1980), #151.

ShoreUPDATE may 2013 CP- as described above.

ShoreUPDATE March 2016:

As described. There are two very distinct layers. The lower is a compacted and mid orangey brown, with dry stone-built structures. Struck flint, including a scraper and animal bone are visible in this deposit. The upper layer is looser and very dark brown containing frequent animal and fish bone.

Management Information
How visible are the remains? (above ground):
not visible
How visible are the remains? (in section):
limited visibility in section
How accessibile is the site?:
accessible- difficult terrain
Comments and recommendations
Recommendations:

Geophysics to ascertain the extent of the site. Section cleaning, sampling and recording to aid dating and characterisation.

Re-assign Priority 1.

25th August, 2018 by RichardParker
Survey Information
User:
RichardParker
Date:
Aug. 25, 2018
Tidal state:
low
Site located?:
Yes
Condition Information
Proximity to coast edge:
coast edge
Coastally eroding?:
active sea erosion; has eroded in the past
Is there a coastal defence?:
no
Description:

A slight rise is located on the coast edge. It measures 30m in diameter and is up to 1.5m high. Sea erosion in front of the mound has exposed archaeological deposits in a 25m long section. To the west side, these include a band of highly organic soil, covering shell midden, which is predominantly cockle. To the east side, occasional large stones and a block of coursed masonry protrude from the section. The block of masonry is faced on one side, extends for 1m and stands to 0.5m or 6 courses in height. The stones lie over a very distinctive, highly organic silty soil layer which is up to 0.35m deep. The site was previously recorded as a broch, on the tenuous evidence that it had been included as such on Petrie's list. Cartloads of stone are said to have been removed from the site, but there is no record of what, if anything, was uncovered during these investigations. Ref.: Orkney Name Book, 2, #24; Petrie, G (1873), 'Notice of the brochs or large round towers of Orkney', Arch Scotica, 5 (1874-1890), 71-94; Hamilton, JRC (1968) 'Excavations at Clickhimin, Shetland', 174; RCAHMS (1946), #182; RCAHMS (1980), #151.

ShoreUPDATE may 2013 CP- as described above.

ShoreUPDATE March 2016:

As described. There are two very distinct layers. The lower is a compacted and mid orangey brown, with dry stone-built structures. Struck flint, including a scraper and animal bone are visible in this deposit. The upper layer is looser and very dark brown containing frequent animal and fish bone.

ShoreUPDATE August 2018:

As described. The stone structures could be the remains of a single drystone building. There are two areas of coursed stonework with a large orthostat between them. Several pieces of struck flint [at least 2 snapped blades] were recovered from the eroding lower compact orangey brown deposit. No animal bone or pottery visible despite careful scrutiny.

Management Information
How visible are the remains? (above ground):
not visible
How accessibile is the site?:
accessible- difficult terrain
The site is:
don't know
Comments and recommendations
Comments:

This looks very like a Neolithic house.

Recommendations:

Section cleaning and recording. Retrieval of samples for dating.