Scotland's Coastal Heritage at Risk

Sites at Risk

New to the Sites at Risk map? Watch our How to... guidance videos to help you get started.

Back to the map of sites.

Branstone Hill (6183)

Current Priority
2
East
347440
North
1044240
Site Type
Structure, Mound And Noost
Period
18-20th C

An unusual structure, which may be of early 18th C date is eroding over low banks. It is associated with a mound and a noost and may have served as a fishing booth or storehouse. The remains of several land drains are exposed in section in front of the structure. (i) A ruinous rectangular structure, measuring 4m by 9m, is located on the coast edge and has been damaged by coastal erosion. There is a door to the northeast corner and a window in the east wall. The walls are up to 1m thick and the window aperture is recessed and is smaller on the exterior than on the interior. There are hearths at either end of the building; both appear to be secondary additions. The walls stand up to 2.5m high at the gables and traces survive of a flagstone roof. (ii) An amorphous grass-covered mound lies to the north side of the structure (i). It measures 8m in diameter and stands up to 1m high. (iii) A noost is cut into the banks directly in front of the structure. It has drystone walls and terminates in a pointed end. It measures 2m in width and survives to a length of 2.5m, the remainder having been eroded away. It is up to 0.5m deep.

ShoreUPDATE 12 May 2015 As described. The structure (i) is actively eroding, and the wall on on the seaward side has now been completely removed, creating section through middle of building. The noost (iii) is now nearly destroyed by erosion, only the upper pointed end survives for a length of approximately 1m. No other archaeological deposits were visible.

Condition and current recommendations:

Condition
Fair
Action
Visit - check condition; characterise site and obtain dating evidence ;
Survey site - standing building survey, possible SRP project

Over to you...

If you know there are errors in the original site record you can edit the original record here

If you would like to visit the site and carry out a ShoreUPDATE survey, you can prepare a ShoreUPDATE pack for this site (PDF) here.

If you want to use your smart phone to carry out the ShoreUPDATE survey, you can download the app here.

If you have completed a field survey of this site, you can submit your ShoreUPDATE record here.

Record WT90 on map Westray: Map 6 in Orkney Coastal Zone Assessment Survey 1998: Westray, Papa Westray, Holm of Papa Westray, West Mainland, 1998

Other records:

NMRS
295861
SMR
Unknown

ShoreUpdates

1 ShoreUpdate accepted and 0 pending.

Click on an update to expand it.

12th May, 2015 by training1
Survey Information
User:
training1
Date:
May 12, 2015
Tidal state:
mid
Site located?:
Yes
Condition Information
Proximity to coast edge:
coast edge
Coastally eroding?:
active sea erosion
Is there a coastal defence?:
no
Other threats?:
structural damage/decay
Description:

An unusual structure, which may be of early 18th C date is eroding over low banks. It is associated with a mound and a noost and may have served as a fishing booth or storehouse. The remains of several land drains are exposed in section in front of the structure. (i) A ruinous rectangular structure, measuring 4m by 9m, is located on the coast edge and has been damaged by coastal erosion. There is a door to the northeast corner and a window in the east wall. The walls are up to 1m thick and the window aperture is recessed and is smaller on the exterior than on the interior. There are hearths at either end of the building; both appear to be secondary additions. The walls stand up to 2.5m high at the gables and traces survive of a flagstone roof. (ii) An amorphous grass-covered mound lies to the north side of the structure (i). It measures 8m in diameter and stands up to 1m high. (iii) A noost is cut into the banks directly in front of the structure. It has drystone walls and terminates in a pointed end. It measures 2m in width and survives to a length of 2.5m, the remainder having been eroded away. It is up to 0.5m deep.

ShoreUPDATE 12 May 2015 As described. The structure (i) is actively eroding, and the wall on on the seaward side has now been completely removed, creating section through middle of building. The noost (iii) is now nearly destroyed by erosion, only the upper pointed end survives for a length of approximately 1m. No other archaeological deposits were visible.

Management Information
How visible are the remains? (above ground):
highly visible (substantial remains)
How visible are the remains? (in section):
clearly visible in section
How accessibile is the site?:
accessible on foot (no footpath)
Comments and recommendations
Recommendations:

Remove from priorities