Scotland's Coastal Heritage at Risk

Sites at Risk

New to the Sites at Risk map? Watch our How to... guidance videos to help you get started.

Back to the map of sites.

Hillock Of Fea (5906)

Current Priority
2
East
349220
North
995570
Site Type
Anthropogenic Deposits
Period
Indeterminate

Anthropogenic deposits are exposed over 8m in the coastal section. At the base of the section, a quantity of slabs forming a flat surface, which is covered by an accumulation of soil containing frequent shell and bone fragments. The second and third levels of stone are separated by stony brash which contains small fragments of burnt bone. This exposure is located to the immediate SW side of the Hillock of Fea (B23) and may be associated with it. Similar deposits were noted by RCAHMS in 1929 and OS in 1973, although in both cases the deposits were described as part of the adjacent cairn (B23: ND 49 NE 7). The 1929 record notes the presence of kitchen-midden in a location where human remains had been found previously (OS 6'' map, 1900, Name Book 1879). The 1973 record noted drystone walling, shell and bone deposits in the erosion face to the SW of the cairn. Since no direct relationship could be established between the eroding deposits and the cairn during this survey, they have been described separately.

03/05/2013 - Only one or two small fragments of bone and shells seen, not midden deposits as such.

Condition and current recommendations:

Condition
Fair
Action
Visit - check condition; characterise site and obtain dating evidence ;
Survey site - using several techniques to characterise site

Over to you...

If you know there are errors in the original site record you can edit the original record here

If you would like to visit the site and carry out a ShoreUPDATE survey, you can prepare a ShoreUPDATE pack for this site (PDF) here.

If you want to use your smart phone to carry out the ShoreUPDATE survey, you can download the app here.

If you have completed a field survey of this site, you can submit your ShoreUPDATE record here.

Record B24 on map Burray: Map 3 in Report on a Coastal Zone Assessment Survey of Orkney: Burra, Flotta, Graemsay, Hoy, S. Ronaldsay, 1997

Other records:

NMRS
9581
SMR
Unknown

ShoreUpdates

1 ShoreUpdate accepted and 0 pending.

Click on an update to expand it.

3rd May, 2013 by mgts24
Survey Information
User:
mgts24
Date:
May 3, 2013
Tidal state:
low
Site located?:
Yes
Condition Information
Proximity to coast edge:
coast edge
Coastally eroding?:
active sea erosion
Is there a coastal defence?:
no
Other threats?:
vegetation growth; animal burrows
Description:

Anthropogenic deposits are exposed over 8m in the coastal section. At the base of the section, a quantity of slabs forming a flat surface, which is covered by an accumulation of soil containing frequent shell and bone fragments. The second and third levels of stone are separated by stony brash which contains small fragments of burnt bone. This exposure is located to the immediate SW side of the Hillock of Fea (B23) and may be associated with it. Similar deposits were noted by RCAHMS in 1929 and OS in 1973, although in both cases the deposits were described as part of the adjacent cairn (B23: ND 49 NE 7). The 1929 record notes the presence of kitchen-midden in a location where human remains had been found previously (OS 6'' map, 1900, Name Book 1879). The 1973 record noted drystone walling, shell and bone deposits in the erosion face to the SW of the cairn. Since no direct relationship could be established between the eroding deposits and the cairn during this survey, they have been described separately.

Management Information
How visible are the remains? (above ground):
highly visible (substantial remains)
How visible are the remains? (in section):
clearly visible in section
How accessibile is the site?:
accessible- difficult terrain
The site is:
don't know
Comments and recommendations
Comments:

Only one or two small fragments of bone and shells seen, not midden deposits as such.

Recommendations:

This is already much disturbed stonework, probably due to erosion, root penetration and soil inflow. Probably not worth protecting unless the adjacent cairn (id 5907) is excavated and determined worth preserving. There does not appear to be any obvious separation between these two sites. They are more or less continuous.