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Gibbhill - Castledykes Point (3951)

Current Priority
2
East
267320
North
550550
Site Type
Shipwreck, Jetty & 'Yair'
Period
Uncertain

A collection of features including a crumbling stone and concrete jetty, linear wooden piles (Yair on O.S. map) and 2 abandoned boats. Located in intertidal zone and under threat from erosion. Jetty is 40m x 8m. Boats; 15m long, 10m long and 4m long.

ShoreUPDATE 21/10/2015

The yair sits on the east side of the river, the slipway and boats are on the west coast.

The slipway was part of the Second World War RAF Air Sea Rescue base at Gibbhill (in use from 1941 to 1944), and is of typical wartime prefab construction. The top is capped with large flat concrete slabs. The landward end is constructed of concrete sandbags, the seaward end is of concrete poured into corrugated shuttering.

The southernmost boat is the smaller of the two, and sits 15m to the north of the slipway. A mooring rope runs from the boat to a large timber post adjacent to the slipway. The boat is built of wood, and survives up to 7m in length, but was originally longer. Survives up to 0.5m in height. Clinker construction with copper alloy fastenings. The front 3.5m of the hull is better-preserved; frames and planking survive on both port and starboard sides, and one floor remains in situ towards the front. One internal plank survives in the starboard side towards the front. The base of the stem post survives, and the keel/keelson survives to a length of 7m.

The northern boat is much larger, c.15m long, appears to be a wooden trawler, settled on its starboard side, with an iron frame at the stern. Wooden carvel build, with iron fittings. Almost the entire hull survives to deck level although there is fire damage on the uppermost exposed port side planking. The stem post survives to its full height, and has evidence of iron sheathing. The hull is largely intact; keel, keelson, deadwood, stem post, floors, frames survive to top timber, internal and external planking, decking and knees all present. A lower deck survives in areas, and superstructure and elements of deck equipment including rusted chains lie in the interior, possibly fallen in when the deck collapsed. Poured concrete ballast sits in situ. The rudder is detached and lies beneath the stern, and a possible exhaust pipe is visible at the stern. Surface treatment includes red paint and pitch. Regular pattern of holes drilled into the external planking below the waterline, later plugged with wood. This suggests that the vessel was a 'wetwell trawler', with a free flooded area of the hull (contained by watertight bulkheads) to allow the catch to be kept alive and fresh before landing, later returned to a conventional trawler by plugging the holes to make the hull watertight.

Various detached metal and timber elements lie loose on the foreshore, though not all are necessarily related to the hulks.

Condition and current recommendations:

Condition
Poor
Action
Visit - assess condition of the site ;
Survey - record wreck, perhaps as NAS project

Over to you...

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Record NX 6732 5055 on map 32 in Coastal Assessment Survey Solway North Coast, 1996

Other records:

NMRS
252144
SMR
MDG22310

ShoreUpdates

1 ShoreUpdate accepted and 0 pending.

Click on an update to expand it.

21st October, 2015 by training1
Survey Information
User:
training1
Date:
Oct. 21, 2015
Tidal state:
low
Site located?:
Yes
Condition Information
Proximity to coast edge:
intertidal
Description:

A collection of features including a crumbling stone and concrete jetty, linear wooden piles (Yair on O.S. map) and 2 abandoned boats. Located in intertidal zone and under threat from erosion. Jetty is 40m x 8m. Boats; 15m long, 10m long and 4m long.

ShoreUPDATE 21/10/2015

The yair sits on the east side of the river, the slipway and boats are on the west coast.

The slipway was part of the Second World War RAF Air Sea Rescue base at Gibbhill (in use from 1941 to 1944), and is of typical wartime prefab construction. The top is capped with large flat concrete slabs. The landward end is constructed of concrete sandbags, the seaward end is of concrete poured into corrugated shuttering.

The southernmost boat is the smaller of the two, and sits 15m to the north of the slipway. A mooring rope runs from the boat to a large timber post adjacent to the slipway. The boat is built of wood, and survives up to 7m in length, but was originally longer. Survives up to 0.5m in height. Clinker construction with copper alloy fastenings. The front 3.5m of the hull is better-preserved; frames and planking survive on both port and starboard sides, and one floor remains in situ towards the front. One internal plank survives in the starboard side towards the front. The base of the stem post survives, and the keel/keelson survives to a length of 7m.

The northern boat is much larger, c.15m long, appears to be a wooden trawler, settled on its starboard side, with an iron frame at the stern. Wooden carvel build, with iron fittings. Almost the entire hull survives to deck level although there is fire damage on the uppermost exposed port side planking. The stem post survives to its full height, and has evidence of iron sheathing. The hull is largely intact; keel, keelson, deadwood, stem post, floors, frames survive to top timber, internal and external planking, decking and knees all present. A lower deck survives in areas, and superstructure and elements of deck equipment including rusted chains lie in the interior, possibly fallen in when the deck collapsed. Poured concrete ballast sits in situ. The rudder is detached and lies beneath the stern, and a possible exhaust pipe is visible at the stern. Surface treatment includes red paint and pitch. Regular pattern of holes drilled into the external planking below the waterline, later plugged with wood. This suggests that the vessel was a 'wetwell trawler', with a free flooded area of the hull (contained by watertight bulkheads) to allow the catch to be kept alive and fresh before landing, later returned to a conventional trawler by plugging the holes to make the hull watertight.

Various detached metal and timber elements lie loose on the foreshore, though not all are necessarily related to the hulks.

Management Information
Comments and recommendations
Recommendations:

Slipway - remove from priorities Boats and yair - reassign to priority 3