Scotland's Coastal Heritage at Risk

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Pettycur Harbour (13572)

Current Priority
2
East
326497
North
686201
Site Type
Harbour
Period
Medieval/Post Medieval

Intermittently exposed remains of substantial foundations of stone harbour are revealed towards the high water mark just west of the present Pettycur harbour. The stone is finely shaped and forms an apparent slipway or jetty at the west end, connecting to a D-shaped structure. This looks like the end of a harbour wall. To the east there are concentric curves of shaped stone forming part of a semi-circular structure. Stone channels or drains are also visible.

This is undoubtedly the remains of Pettycur’s medieval harbour, which a church record from Perth dated 25th August 1625 states that in March 1625 there was “a great and ferefull storne and tempest which led to the harbour of Pretticur being totallie overthrawin and brokin down”.

The present harbour dates from around 1760. Angus Graham, A., 1968 The Harbours of Eastern Scotland

The remains of the ‘Old Harbour’ is shown on a technical drawing by John Rennie in 1801, for a proposed new basin to clear sand form the present harbour. Original record held in Institution of Civil Engineers, Reference: REN/RB/03/202 Further information can be found on the SCHARP blog: https://scharpblog.wordpress.com/2015/12/15/pettycurs-17th-century-storm-wrecked-harbour-revealed/

Condition and current recommendations:

Condition
Action

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Other records:

NMRS
Unknown
SMR
Unknown

ShoreUpdates

1 ShoreUpdate accepted and 0 pending.

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24th May, 2017 by jo
Survey Information
User:
jo
Date:
May 24, 2017
Tidal state:
low
Site located?:
Yes
Condition Information
Proximity to coast edge:
intertidal
Coastally eroding?:
active sea erosion; has eroded in the past
Is there a coastal defence?:
no
Description:

Intermittently exposed remains of substantial foundations of stone harbour are revealed towards the high water mark just west of the present Pettycur harbour. The stone is finely shaped and forms an apparent slipway or jetty at the west end, connecting to a D-shaped structure. This looks like the end of a harbour wall. To the east there are concentric curves of shaped stone forming part of a semi-circular structure. Stone channels or drains are also visible.

This is undoubtedly the remains of Pettycur’s medieval harbour, which a church record from Perth dated 25th August 1625 states that in March 1625 there was “a great and ferefull storne and tempest which led to the harbour of Pretticur being totallie overthrawin and brokin down”.

The present harbour dates from around 1760. Angus Graham, A., 1968 The Harbours of Eastern Scotland

The remains of the ‘Old Harbour’ is shown on a technical drawing by John Rennie in 1801, for a proposed new basin to clear sand form the present harbour. Original record held in Institution of Civil Engineers, Reference: REN/RB/03/202 For more information see the SCHARP blog post https://scharpblog.wordpress.com/2015/12/15/pettycurs-17th-century-storm-wrecked-harbour-revealed/

Management Information
How visible are the remains? (above ground):
limited visibility (partial remains)
How visible are the remains? (in section):
not visible
How accessibile is the site?:
easily accessible- no restrictions
The site is:
has local associations/history
Comments and recommendations
Recommendations:

Rare suvival of a medieval/early modern harbour linked to historical record of it's destruction in 1625. A Located in the intertidal zone. Limited investigation and recording undertaken through SCHARP, but would benefit from more detailed survey and historical research. Assign Priority 2.